U.S. Detention Camps, 1942-1946 (exhibition)


Traveling exhibition organized by the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) that debuted in April 1990. Consisting of ninety framed photographs with captions, text panels, and titles, U.S. Detention Camps was likely the first exhibition to go beyond the story of the ten War Relocation Authority administered camps to include the so-called "assembly centers" as well as the enemy alien detention camps administered by the army and by the Justice Department as a part of the larger story. Aiming, in the words of project directory and NJAHS president Clifford Uyeda, to tell the full story "from the beginning of the experience to the end," the exhibition begins with the anti-Japanese movement and stretches through the Redress Movement, while also depicting inmate resistance, and controversially, suicides.[1] Venues for U.S. Detention Camps included the Jimmy Carter Museum in Atlanta, Georgia; the Swords to Plowshare Gallery in Detroit, Michigan; and Stanford University's Meyer Library.

Authored by Brian Niiya, Densho

For More Information

Exhibition page, National Japanese American Historical Society website, http://www.njahs.org/programs/viewdetails.php?id=32.

Murray, Alice Yang. Historical Memories of the Japanese American Internment and the Struggle for Redress. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008.

Overmyer, Deborah A., and Geoffrey J. Giglierano. "American Museums and Executive Order 9066: Who Has Told the Story, The Story That Was Told." In Alien Justice: Wartime Internment in Australia and North America. Edited by Kay Saunders and Roger Daniels. Queensland, Australia: University of Queensland Press, 2000. 234–54.

Uyeda, Clifford, ed. Supplement to U.S. Detention Camps Photo Exhibit. San Francisco: National Japanese American Historical Society, 1989.

Footnotes

  1. Deborah A. Overmyer, and Geoffrey J. Giglierano, "American Museums and Executive Order 9066: Who Has Told the Story, The Story That Was Told," In Alien Justice: Wartime Internment in Australia and North America, edited by Kay Saunders and Roger Daniels (Queensland, Australia: University of Queensland Press, 2000), 242.